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tv   Prime News  HLN  August 14, 2009 5:00pm-7:00pm EDT

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this just in today. michael vick signed with the philadelphia eagles. he paid for his crime, almost two years in federal prison for bank rolling a dogfighting operation at his home. what do you think, does he deserve a second chance? a would-be robber tries to pull a fast one on a convenience store. the husband wasn't having any part of it. he tackles the guy, wrestles him outside. the husband was brave defending his wife. is that the smartest thing to do? we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln. e-mail us cnn.com/primenews. or text us at hlntv, all you have to do is start your message with the word prime. it's your chance to be heard.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com welcome once again. this is "prime news." i'm mike galanos. a search warrant in the michael jackson death investigation. just released to the public. police and federal drug agents hot on the trial of the powerful potent anesthetic propofol. we now know that's the evidence they're zeroing in on at that las vegas pharmacy that they raided three days ago. dr. conrad murray, personal physician to the king of pop, seems to be the central figure in this ongoing investigation. what's his connection to this pharmacy? do they have the proof they need for criminal charges? we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln. joining me to talk about it, let's welcome back kim for in touch weekly. anita kay, criminal defense attorney and former prosecutor. anita, i'll start with you. it's no surprise they're looking for propofol. but if they connect dr. murray with propofol at that pharmacy in las vegas, does that mean
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automatic that's criminal? what have we got here? >> not necessarily automatic. but it's getting steps and steps closer to possibly criminal charges. because we need to link dr. murray to the diprivan, to that drug. then you have the witness statement who says, you know, i saw him administer it within 24 hours. we've heard from doctors this can dissipate from your system rather quickly. since we're not privy to the autopsy report, we don't know if in fact that drug was foind in michael jackson's system. what they're going to have to do is piece it together through other evidence if it's not in his system. >> kim, we have sources close to the investigation telling cnn that dr. murray admitted that he administered prop oh pol within 24 hours of michael jackson's death, right? >> exactly. a law enforcement source has said that. and then, of course, there's the new report that three sources have come out to say that dr. murray gave michael jackson the propofol, then walked out of the room to make some phone calls.
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and then walked back in, and that's when he couldn't revive him. of course, that's the new news. and also, dr. murray's lawyer is now saying that dr. murray found michael jackson's behavior was unusual. he didn't know this kind of unusual behavior, he didn't know he was an addict. i think this is all playing into the issue whether he gave him propofol, whether there were for, that's a paraphrase, what his attorney is saying. so what? that doesn't mean you dangerously give the guy propofol, right? >> exactly. i also question the doctor who's coming on the scene who says, i saw some unusual behavior, but didn't really mean anything to me. i don't know ha that means, because if you're a doctor, you're in a better position to know if someone has a dependency to drugs. and then when you're giving such powerful drugs, you should probably check out to see if
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your patient should be even given these drugs, which as we've talked about the diprivan, he had no business ever administering that. >> every doctor we've talked to said how reckless that is. us as lay people can understand that. go ahead, kim. >> even just an average, any layperson without a medical degree has read reports about michael jackson in the past. and knows about his drug use. i think that's something that also would come into play. >> kim, as we look at the search warrant, are they looking for other drugs besides propofol? that dr. murray may have been prescribing for michael jackson? >> right now, we know at this nevada pharmacy, what they were looking for was this propofol and a law enforcement source says they did find evidence that linked dr. murray to buying it at this nevada pharmacy on may 12th, i believe. they're saying these specific doses were the ones that they think dr. murray gave to michael jackson. >> anita, does it work or against dr. murray if other
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drugs, he prescribed other drugs and other drugs are found in his system when we finally see the toxicology report? how reckless, that he's not only giving propofol, but other drugs? >> it depends on how you spin it. as a prosecutor, absolutely, i would say, come on, you mean, he's just giving him a cocktail of drugs. it's beyond reckless. because you have all these other drugs in his system, if that's what the aup's shows. from the defense perspective, look, he was administering all of these, it was okay, everything was all right, he wasn't reckless, this has been going on for a long period of time. maybe he was just following what other doctors had done. so it's just how you spin it. but it doesn't look good for dr. murray. every day we find more information. >> that's a great point there. real quick, i've got to ask kim this one, did joe jackson charge the city of gary, indiana, $5,000 to appear at his son's memorial? >> you know, i don't know the answer to that. but, you know, on a money issue,
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at least we know that one positive note is that michael jackson's estate has raised $100 million so far. and john branco said he will probably make $200 million, his estate will. that's a positive thing for his kids, that's just by the end of this year. >> we'll wrap it up on a positive note. thank you. new revelations, two air traffic controllers linked to the horrific mid-air collision above the hudson rimp. one guy was on the phone, his supervisor, nowhere to be found. are they to blame for the crash?
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welcome back. we have new chilling video of
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that fatal crash over the hudson river saturday. two air crafts collided mid-air. here it is. amateur video here. you see the helicopter the left side of the screen. the plane is going to come in right there. clipped the copter wing it looks like. that was a tourist camera shown on nbc news. there it is in slow motion. you see the plane coming from the left side. everyone onboard passed away, we know that. now two new jersey air controllers have been suspended. reports that one was actually on the phone with his girlfriend. his supervisor wandered off, wasn't even in the tower. yet the faa insists these controllers are not to blame. we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln is the number. here to talk about it, kim, reporter from the new york daily news, and mary schafo. mary, with the air traffic controllers, one guy on the phone, supervisor nowhere to be
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found, could they -- anywhich they could be to blame? >> the additional facts that have come out today, there is. we were -- there were supposed to be five in that tower. there were only two there. and of the two, one was acting as the supervisor because the supervisor is out. there is an faa regulation, 2-1-6 that requires the controllers to let aircraft know they're in a conflict situation, meaning they're about to run into each other. now, the teterboro controller says that he tried. of course, he was on the phone with his girlfriend, but he never reached the plane and he never let newark know he did not reach that plane to give the alert. that could be a problem for the faa. >> ken, what do you have on that end? could these air traffic controllers be blamed at some point? >> well, as of right now, the national transportation safety board and the faa, the federal aviation administration, are saying, no, they are not to be blamed for this. it's sort of like a parallel
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investigation, if you will. in the course of trying to put this together exactly what happened, they discovered that some pretty serious procedures weren't followed. but as of right now, there's just no evidence that, you know, conclusively can say that these gentlemen have a direct responsibility. >> let me read a statement, air control statement. here it is. accusations that insulting. mary, your reaction to that statement? >> they're going to have to examine, as i mentioned, the air traffic controller rule 2-1-6 that requires these alerts. because he gave the alert and the pilot didn't get it, he filled his duty, that will probably be an issue for the court. >> mary, let's look at -- as you saw the video, mary, what set the table for that tragedy? >> well, what set the table is newark did not want that
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aircraft in the direction in which it was -- excuse me, the fixed-wing aircraft in the direction in which it was headed, and newark asked teterboro to please divert it, send it on a different heading. we now know the pilot did not get that heading. it never excuses anyone on visual flight rules from flying into the path of other aircraft. you're supposed to see and avoid. since newark already told teterboro they didn't want the fixed-wing aircraft to follow the route it was following, i think they should have used far more effort than just radioing twice and not getting a response. then, of course, the helicopter should have been alerted as well. >> okay. ken, give us a picture of how much traffic can go on over the hudson below 1,000 feet, because that's something that everybody wants to look into, right, ken? >> well, it's amazing. you spend any amount of time in the city and you have all of these tourist helicopters, and, you know, we have folks at my
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own newspaper who are pilots that fly out of teterboro. that's their weekend recreation. the corridor is a highway. as mayor bloomberg will say over and over again, it's important to keep it open. it's part of the culture of the city. it's part of the beauty of the city. but it is truly a highway in the sky. and, you know, anyone, whether you're on the ground, anywhere in the city, you can look up and you will see that the skies are just full over the river. >> highway in the sky, wow, quite a statement there. guys, we're going to have to leave it there. ken, mary, we appreciate it. coming up, a georgia woman's terrifying phone call, as she apparently is kidnapped on a remote road. she's on the phone with her boyfriend, then suddenly he hears her say, don't take me. the line drops. she hasn't been seen since.
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a frightening story in
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blairsville, georgia, north georgia. christie cornwell walking across a remote area tuesday. near her parents' home. 38-year-old, talking to her boyfriend on the phone. he hears the concern in her voice as she sees a car approach. the last thing he hears, she is screaming and says, don't take me. the line goes dead. she hasn't been seen since. joining me now to talk about this, michelle with "america's most wanted." and criminologist, jack lef in. jonk bankhead is with us with the georgia bureau of investigation. and richard cornwell, cristi's brother. richard, do you have any idea what could have happened to your sister here? >> well, from the evidence that's been collected thus far
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remote road here that your sister had walked? sounded like walked many times. >> yes. there's only a handful of houses on this road. it's a very rural area. and she did -- she liked to walk down this particular road, leaving her parents' house. and she walked for exercise. tuesday night was when the abduction occurred on the country road. >> richard, what's your plea to whoever may have done this to your sister? >> we just plead that they would have mercy on her. and return her safely back to her family. and we just want to say that we need her. and she has a 15-year-old son
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that needs her very much. in his life. >> richard -- >> we just pray she will be returned safely. >> we'll pray right along with you. richard cornwell, thanks again for joining us. john bankhead on the phone, georgia bureau of from reliable sources abduction. and we're following up on those identified the witnesses, but they're very reliable, known in the community. and would know if there would be an unusual vehicle in that area. >> okay. and these cars do not belong to anybody who lives in that area?
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>> that's what we're looking at. right now we don't think that's the case. but road checks during the night information on those vehicles. let's bring in michelle, "america's most wanted." michelle, anything you can add to the search? any leads you're hearing about? >> also from investigators, i have brought in blood 100 people on addition, there's about submit your tip anonymously, or call us at 1-800-crimetv. we'll pass that off to investigators that are working there at the command post in georgia. that's something to consider. also, i learned today, kristi
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was a former probation officer, that she was going through a career change, in college, as a full-time student, working to be a lab technician, and moving forward with her life. we're just really hoping at this point that if anybody saw anything in that area, i want to encourage you, you don't have to call someone. taking every lead seriously and they will move forward as quickly as they can to find kristi. >> jack, what are you seeing here? and how do you narrow this down? where do you start? >> well, first of all, the police have a great advantage here. most of the missing people in this country are gone by choice. they want to get away from a bad situation. and the police are reluctant to get involved for a period of time.
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and then killed within hours. so here at least the police know that she's not a missing person by choice. they have apparently ruled out the family members. and they are looking, i believe, for an acquaintance or a stranger. i think the idea that she was a probation officer, they would have to look at her clients and hopefully she will be brought home alive. >> yeah. that's right. john bankhead, there are reports taken, is that true? call right after this cell phone call between the boyfriend and the victim. and responded to the scene. >> to pick up right there after the break.
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welcome back. this story, you've got to watch this video here. it's a holdup at a convenience store. the clerk is being held up by a robber. the husband of the clerk is not having any part of it. watch him come flying in here. armed robber, and it is go time, as the husband begins to wrestle this guy. it lasts about ten minutes. we'll pick up the story from there a little bit later in the show. if you have thoughts on it, call in, 1-877-tell-hln. and we want to hear from you on this story. michael vick, major announcement. a lot of people are talking about it. he signs with the philadelphia eagles after almost two years in a federal prison for dogfighting. he's going to take the field again.
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here he is speaking just a few hours ago at a news conference. >> you only get one shot at a second chance. and i'm conscious of that. >> i think he should have a chance at redemption. and the eagles are going to give it to him. two-year contract. we're talking about a strong organization. good coach. he's got a friend in donovan mcnabb. he's known vick since vick was a senior in high school. a great opportunity. yes, what michael vick good was heinous. but he's owning up too it. let's listen to michael vick. >> i was wrong for what i did. everything that happened at that point in time of my life was wrong. and, you know, it was unnecessary. and to this day, i can't understand why i was involved in such pointless activity. and why did i risk so much at the pinnacle of my career. and i was naive to a lot of things. but i figure if if i can help more animals than i hurt, i'm
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contributing, i'm doing my part. >> hopefully his platform playing football again will lead to the end of this barbaric dogfighting. so let's hope he can do some good out of all this. we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln is the number. want to bring in anthony, sports caster, philadelphia. also with us, welcoming back stephen a. smith, journalist, with espn, with me at cnnsi, and with the philadelphia enquire rer 13 years. he knows this teams, he knows the fans as well. we'll take your calls. before we go on, we got a brief snippet what fans are saying about the signing. let's listen to that and we'll take it from there. >> so what. >> he's a great football player. >> whatever happened, he's done with it, he served his time. >> i'm just a little upset with it, because i'm such an animal lover. >> i'm not sure where we're going with this team. >> crazy signing. i don't know what they're going to do with the public relations part of it. >> kind of a mix there. fans in phillie. we want to hear from you,
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1-877-tell-hln is the number. anthony, thumbs up or thumbs down on this from the fans? >> i think mostly thumbs down. >> really? >> yeah. i would look at it as a moderate uprising. hasn't been all that re volt. but fans haven't welcomed michael vick with open arms. >> any specifics on what they're saying? they just don't -- >> well, it's not he's just forgiven. they're kind of caught offguard. they don't know michael vick. this is not a town where he built up goodwill. they view him strictly as what they saw, as a guy who did what he did, and they also question what he's going to do with this football team. >> we'll talk about that in a little built. let's stick with the fans. stephen, you know the team, you know these fans. do you think they're going to embrace him? >> i think they'll embrace him if he's ultimately effective on the football field and stays out of trouble. nobody knows the pulse of philadelphia as anthony, my man. the fans are going to be down on him at the beginning because he
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don't know him. you have to take into consideration, mike, the fact that this is a city that was down on t.o. because of an attitude issue. this is a man that helped them get to the super bowl. this is a man that helped donovon mcnabb record his best season statistically until last year, i believe. you consider what t.o. did, and the fact that the city turned against him. he didn't break any laws, didn't get into any trouble. he was just, you know, a malcontent. here you have a guy that committed a felony, that was responsible in large part for funding an operation in terms of torturing, hanging, electrocuting, maiming and killing dogs, it's going to be a long time. the city of philadelphia can be very hard on you. ultimately it's one of the best sports cities in america. it will stand by and support you if you do right. but if you do wrong, you do not want to be on their bad side. >> you make a great point, anthony, press, fans can be brutal in phillie. they booed santa one year, right? >> that's ancient history. but it's a town that is prone, i
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think, to either loving you or overloving you, or like stephen said, it can be very, very harsh. and it can bare its teeth. >> let me ask you this. michael vick busts out a ooh-yard touchdown run, is all forgiven at that point? >> yeah. you know, in the end, we're all pro-hypocrisy in sports. any moral stance that the sports fan has now will certainly dissipate if he's in the end zone, or if he leads them to a super bowl. and something happens with donovan mcnabb. >> steve, you say it's going to take a couple of touchdowns? >> no doubt about it. if donovan mcnabb struggles this quarterback, and e he did to the franchise, and negative off the field, i
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think you'll see a lot of people rallying around. >> bob in florida, your thoughts here? >> caller: hello? >> bob, go ahead. >> caller: oh, yeah. my question i had was, kind of different, because why cleveland didn't try to draft him. i just started thinking, maybe they had the dog pen, and i wondered if he would get a violation of probation. >> a little bit of sarcasm on a friday. that brings up a good point, anthony. when the eagles go on the road, michael vick's going to take a beating. it's going to get ugly. >> it certainly will. it's interesting how much he's going to play. like stephen said, donovan mcnabb is this team's quarterback, and how it goes is dependent on donovan mcnabb. i can see michael vick being in there for a half dozen plays, as a wildcat. there's a lot of things you can do with him. that's the role. but he's not going to come in here as a quarterback. donovan mcnabb, this is his team.
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>> i would like to make one other point. >> do we have to take a break? let's take a quick break. we have calls lined up. we're also going to let you know what the humane society is saying about this. giving it a thumbs up or thumbs down. can michael vick help eradicate dogfighting? call in.
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welcome back. michael vick back in the nfl. getting a lot of e-mails. this one coming to us from
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barbara in greensboro, north carolina. second chances should be earned, not handed out like lollipops. do people really think one day michael vick thinks dogfighting is okay and the next day it is wrong? wake up, folks. well, he did have 17 months at humane society saying. programs to steer inner city combat dogfighting in philadelphia and nationwide. stephen, you know, you and i talked about this, as this story was really simmering, that i think his career should be tied to real long-term work with the humane society. and that seems like that's the case. will that quiet the critics
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somewhat? >> it won't immediately. but i think over time, as he proves to be diligent, in his efforts with the humane society, to curb the issue of animal cruelty, and to address that head-on, i think it's going to work wonders for him. the one thing that i would like to add, that i think people need to be very, very careful about, michael vick was convicted of a felony financing a dog fighting ring. let's judge him according to that. let's not think that all of a sudden we have the right to sit there and say, make a big issue if the man doesn't smile, if he gets in an argument with his teammate, if he gets stopped for a speeding ticket and all this other stuff. the man was convicted of funding a dogfighting ring. as long as he re frans from any of that, any illegal activity, it's not for the rest of us to sit there and feel like he has the right to judge everything he does in his life. >> jeff in california, what do you think of michael vick's work with the humane society? does that encourage you?
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>> caller: no, not really. i don't think he should be allowed to play football ever after all of the things that he did. you know, what i can think is of pete rose, he made a simple bet, and he was kicked out of baseball, and he was not even allowed to be in the hall of fame, you know. and he didn't hurt anybody or any animals or anything. he made a bet. >> saying he's out of there. let's bring back anthony, sports reporter. as we dissect this and see his work with the humane society, do you see michael vick as a changed man? >> not yet. i think you have to see him. i think right now, it begins his penance. he was just granted the opportunity. of course he's going to say all the right things, and he did that today. but it's not ready just to welcome him back. now you have to prove to the masses that you are sin seerp, that you do want to do the right things, that you do want to help a city that, let's face it, is
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plagued by dogfighting. >> and hopefully he can help eradicate it. here's michael vick. basically, no excuses. let's listen. >> we all use the excuse, it was part of our culture. and, you know, i don't think that's an excuse. now i understand that people care about their animals. and the welfare and protection of animals. now i do. >> there it is. owning up to it right there. i've got to ask you this, anthony, see if you can weigh in as well. how are the fans in phillie going to re act if the protesters come and disrupt eagles football? >> i think they understand the bigness of this whole thing. transcends sports. understand that. obviously in the end it's a rabid football town and it wants to see its eagles. it's going to expect a lot out of michael vick. i think it's going to be interesting, because michael
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vick is not going to be out in the forefront. he's only going to be there a half dozen plays. >> right. stephen, real quick, go ahead. how are phillies fans going to react to the animal rights protesters? >> i think some will support him and come to the defense of michael vick. the fact is, as long as this guy obeys the law and doesn't engage in dogfighting and does his work with the humane society, he's going to have his critics, he's going to have his add vo indicates. that's all it comes down to. everybody else that the people have mentioned, the man spent 18 months in a federal penitentiary. he had to watch his back. he had a lot of stuff to be concerned about. now he's a free man. i don't think he's even concerned about it. he just wants to make sure he stays out of trouble. >> anthony, stephen, thanks so much. thanks to the viewers for the calls as well. here's a story for you. see this video. robber at a convenience store. well, the husband sees what's going on here. he's going to tackle the guy. it's about a ten-minute fight. we'll let you know how it all
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played out. take your calls in a little bit. let's get to our hero of the week, new york-based chemistry teacher. i was coming from college at night, and i see this computer thrown out. i found everything was perfect. so many computers are thrown out and so much computers are needed where i grew up in kenya. so i decided i must do something. my name is jude ndambuki. i fix computers and send them to kenya. the children in kenya have very few resources. pencil is very h get. anything to make the life for the kids better, it's great. the computers are tested to make sure they are working. then we label the name of the school on each box, and then we ship it to kenya.
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the computers are saved from poisoning the environment, and they're going to be used for 20 years by some schools. every school is going to plant 100 trees for every computer. we are planting a seed, teaching the kids to conserve the environment, and be engines of change. it's like giving the kids a new life. computers are getting new life, and trees are being planted to bring a new life, too. it's all connected.
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new program is helping
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african-american men beat some pretty serious odds. it started with a surgeon who said he saw the same shooting, stabbing victims again and again in the trauma center. richelle carey has that story, in our weekly feature what matters. >> young african-american men are at increased risk to falling victim to gun violence. and those who survive are more likely to return to bad habits. one man who could have become a statistic decided to make a change. with strength, courage and turn away from street life. here's don lemon from our sister network, cnn. >> this is where i used to get busy, you know. >> reporter: adrian barnes admits he was a bad boy on baltimore streets. he said he even shot a man. >> i used to hustle drugs right here. here's where i got shot. >> reporter: barnes became a victim of the violence he inflicted with two bullets in his leg. >> i was lying there, thinking about all the stuff i did to people. i had to learn from my lesson.
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>> reporter: recovering in the shock trauma center, he had a conversation that changed his life. >> the probation officer that worked for the program asked me if i wanted to change my life. and i thought about it.like, ye. because i was getting tired. you know, living the way i'm living. >> reporter: the program barnes is referring to is the violence intervention program, or vip. surgeon cornell cooper start td after he saw the same shooting and stabbing victims again and again. >> we all get frustrated with seeing patients that we worked so hard to save then come back. i grew up in a neighborhood in south carolina. these guys were just like me. i did not feel that these were individuals who were so steeped in the way of life that you could not turn them around. >> reporter: cooper treated street violence as a disease. >> we need to have the same approach to violence that we had with heart disease and smoking
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and embrace this problem of violence in our kids because they're dying. >> reporter: cooper's cure -- a combination of drug rehab, education, and jobs. >> the patients who got our intervention were much less likely to be convicted. >> reporter: patients like adrian barnes, who turned his life around. >> all you need is somebody to help you, show you that they care about you. the program's been real good. they never turned their back on me. >> listen to that. that was don lemon from our sister network, cnn, reporting. since 1998 the vip program has been committed to saving patients' lives and their future. today similar programs are being considered in other cities. for more on what matters check out the september issue of "essence" magazine or log on to cnn.com/whatmatters. >> richelle, thanks for that. coming up, a husband tries to play hero for his wife, who was being held up.
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cnn, headlines news, or msnbc are locked on your favorites? if they are i've got the gift for you. i'm gonna richardson and my next guest is ken pullson. a pleasure to have you here. >> good to be with you >> what is the museum. most people know. >> sometimes there you an a museum in articling ton, virginia called the museum. it was an effort to remind
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americans of the value of news gathering in america and a nod to the first amendment. we did so well there so we decided to take it where the action is. we have a brand new museum called a the museum on pennsylvania avenue. it's a -- it's a 45 word sign out front with the words of the first amendment 'em blazed there. we think it's healthy for them to read that says congress shall make no law. we're attempting to put it in neon. >> it is flashing? >> it's not a tribute to journalists. we had a blogger say i'm not going to set foot in that museum until they do an extra special to copy editors. it is not about you. it is a museum of history but a
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different kind that reports what happened over the last several centuries through the eyes of journalists. so you get contemporary coverage of the assassination of kennedy and arrival of the beatles and the civil war and fascinating >> exactly. what have the visitors reactions been for the first year? exciting. we see the full range of course. tremendous amount of school groups and a lot of tourists visiting washingt washingto was. we bill ourselves as the world's most interactive museum. young people can play the part of a reporter or an editor or a journalist. we can even stand up in front of what you and your business called blue screen, to tape a broadcast announcement for their friends and family and then send it out to friends at home. amazing exhibits there.
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i well tell you, i can say this with some degree of humility. i just joined the museum in february, i've been the editor of u.s. a. today for the last five years. we have the largest piece of the berlin wall in north america. you can go there and see that and the guard tower in collaboration and partnership with the f.b. i.we celebrate their 100th anniversary and we have phenomenal artifacts. we have the unibomber's cabin believe it or not. and depending on your age, some of your viewers probably remember patty hurst and her tenure with the liberation army. we have the gun she used in the bank robbery and the leather jacket she wore. we have can coverage including
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dillinger's death mask and the bullet pruf vest he zn wear on that night >> with you have so many different exhibits. what do you have planned for us your second year? >> one of the great things about working for a museum where news is in the title we're updating and reflect the headlines in the museum. not long ago when there was an uproar in iran we covered the social network and the twittering. when newspapers have collapsed and some markets we quickly reported that. upcoming exhibits include: throughout the next year you'll be able to see manhunt exhibit about the assassination of abraham lincoln and barack ob a obama. >> i'm so sorry. we've run out of time but
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everyone has got and go and see the museum. >> thank you very much >> my guest has been ken pullson president of
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this just in today. michael vick signs with the philadelphia eagles. he paid for his crime, almost two years in federal prison for bankrolling a dogfighting operation at his home. so what do you think, does he deserve a second chance? and a would-be robber tries to pull a fast one on a clerk at a convenience store. ah, but the husband wasn't having any part of it. he tackles the guy, wrestles him outside. the husband was brave defending his wife. is that the smartest thing to do? we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln. e-mail us cnn.com/primenews. or text us at hlntv, all you have to do is start your message with the word prime.
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it's your chance to be heard. >> controversy, opinion, your point of view. this is "prime news." welcome once again. this is "prime news." story, a search warrant in the michael jackson death investigation. just released to the public. police and federal drug agents hot on the trial of the powerful potent anesthetic propofol. we now know that's the evidence they're zeroing in on at that las vegas pharmacy that they raided three days ago. dr. conrad murray, personal physician to the king of pop, seems to be the central figure in this ongoing investigation. what's his connection to this pharmacy? do they have the proof they need for criminal charges? we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln. joining me to talk about it, let's welcome back kim serafin, senior editor for "in touch weekly." and also anita kay, criminal defense attorney and former prosecutor. anita, i'll start with you. it's no surprise they're looking for propofol. but if they connect dr. murray with propofol at that pharmacy in las vegas, does that mean automatic that's criminal? what have we got here?
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>> well, not necessarily automatic. but it's getting steps and steps closer to possibly criminal charges. because we need to link dr. murray to the diprivan, to that drug. then you have the witness statement who says, you know, i saw him administer it within 24 hours. we've heard from doctors this can dissipate from your system rather quickly. since we're not privy to the autopsy report, we don't know if in fact that drug was foind in michael jackson's system. what they're going to have to do is piece it together through other evidence if it's not in his system. >> kim, we have sources close to the investigation telling cnn that dr. murray admitted that he administered propofol within 24 hours of michael jackson's death, right? >> exactly. a law enforcement source has said that. and then, of course, there's the new report that three sources have come out to say that dr. murray gave michael jackson the propofol, then walked out of the
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room to make some phone calls. and then walked back in, and that's when he couldn't revive him. of course, that's the new news. and also, dr. murray's lawyer is now saying that dr. murray found michael jackson's behavior was unusual. he didn't know this kind of unusual behavior, he didn't know he was an addict. so i think all of this is playing into this issue of whether he gave him propofol, from another doctor. >> anita, that sounds like a so you come onto the scene and you bargained for, that's a paraphrase, what his attorney is saying. so what? that doesn't mean you dangerously give the guy propofol, right? >> exactly. i also question the doctor who's coming on the scene who says i saw some unusual behavior but it didn't really mean anything to me. i don't know what that means. because if you're a doctor, you're in a better position to know if someone has a dependency to drugs. and then when you're giving such powerful drugs, you should probably check out to see if
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your patient should be even given these drugs, which as we've talked about the diprivan, he had no business ever administering that. >> every doctor we've talked to said just how reckless that is. us as lay people can understand that. go ahead, kim. >> even just an average, any layperson without a medical degree has read reports about michael jackson in the past and knows about his drug use. so i think that's something that also would come into play. >> kim, as we look at the search warrant, are they looking for other drugs besides propofol? that dr. murray may have been prescribing for michael jackson? >> right now, we know at this nevada pharmacy, what they were looking for was this propofol and a law enforcement source says they did find evidence that linked dr. murray to buying it at this nevada pharmacy on may 12th, i believe. they're saying these specific doses were the ones that they think dr. murray gave to michael jackson. >> anita, does it work for or against dr. murray if other
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drugs -- he prescribed other drugs and other drugs are found in his system when we finally see the toxicology report? does that work as a defense, or does that cut the other way and say how reckless that he's not only giving the guy propofol but other drugs? >> well, see, it depends on how you spin it. so as the prosecutor, absolutely. i would say come on, he's just giving him a cocktail of drugs. it's beyond reckless. because you have all these other drugs in his system, if that's what the autopsy shows. then from the defense perspective i would say no, look, he was administering all of these, it was okay. everything was all right, he wasn't reckless, this has been going on for a long period of time. maybe he was just following what other doctors had done. so it's just how you spin it. but it doesn't look good for dr. murray. every day we find more information. >> that's a great point there. real quick, i've got to ask kim this one, did joe jackson charge the city of gary, indiana $5,000 to appear at his son's memorial? >> you know, i don't know the answer to that.
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but you know, sort of on a money issue, at least we know that one positive note is that michael jackson's estate has raked in $100 million so far. and john branco said he will probably make $200 million, his estate will. that's a positive thing for his kids, that's just by the end of this year. >> we'll wrap it up on a positive note. kim, thank you. anita, thank you as well. coming up, new revelations as two air traffic controllers suspended linked to that horrific mid-air collision above the hudson river. we're finding out one guy was on the phone. his supervisor nowhere to be found. so are they to blame for the crash?
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welcome back. we have new video of that fatal crash over the hudson river saturday. two aircrafts collided mid-air. here it is. amateur video here. here it is. amateur video here. you see the helicopter the left side of the screen. the plane is going to come in right there. clipped the copter wing it looks like. that was originally shown -- again, it was a tourist camera. shown on nbc news. the sightseeing helicopter in slow motion as you see the plane come in from the left side. everyone on board passed away. we know that. now two new jersey air controllers have been suspended. reports that one was actually on the phone with his girlfriend. his supervisor wandered off, wasn't even in the tower. we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln is the number. here to talk about it, kim bass inette, reporter, "new york daily news." also with us, mary schiavo. mary, let's start with you. with the air traffic
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controllers, people hear this, one guy's on the phone, supervisor nowhere to be found. are they, could they -- any way they could be to blame here? >> yes, with the additional facts that have come out today, there is. there were supposed to be five in that tower. there were only two there. and of the two one was acting as the supervisor because the supervisor was out. there is an faa regulation, 2-1-6 that requires the controllers to let aircraft know they're in a conflict situation, meaning they're about to run into each other. now, the teterboro controller says that he tried. of course, he was on the phone with his girlfriend, but he never reached the plane and he never let newark know he did not reach that plane to give the alert. that could be a problem for the faa. >> ken, what do you have on that end? could these air traffic controllers be blamed at some point? >> well, as of right now, the national transportation safety board and the faa, the federal aviation administration, are saying no, they are not to be blamed for this. it's sort of like a parallel investigation, if you will.
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in the course of trying to put this together exactly what happened, they discovered that some pretty serious procedures weren't followed. but as of right now, there's just no evidence that, you know, conclusively can say that these gentlemen have a direct responsibility. >> let me read a statement, air control statement. here it is. allude or make accusations that to absolutely absurd mary, your reaction to that statement? >> they're going to have to examine, as i mentioned, federal -- the air traffic controller rule 2-1-6, which requires these alerts. now, it's because he gave the alert and the pilot didn't get it, he fulfilled his duty, i'm afraid that's going to be an issue probably for the court. >> mary, let's look at -- as you saw the video, mary, what set the table for that tragedy? >> well, what set the table is newark did not want that
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aircraft in the direction in which it was -- excuse me, the fixed-wing aircraft in the direction in which it was headed, and newark asked teterboro to please divert it, send it on a different heading. and of course we now know that that pilot did not get that heading. it never excuses anyone on visual flight rules from flying into the path of other aircraft. you're supposed to see and avoid. but since newark already told teterboro they didn't want that fixed-wing aircraft following the route it was following, i think they should have used far more effort than just radioing twice and not getting a response. and of course then the rotocraft, the helicopter should have been alerted as well. >> okay. ken, give us a picture of how much traffic can go on over the hudson below 1,000 feet, because that's something that everybody wants to look into, right, ken? >> well, it's amazing. you spend any amount of time in the city and you have all of these tourist helicopters and, you know, we have folks at my
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own newspaper who are pilots who fly out of teterboro. that's their weekend recreation. the corridor is a highway. and as mayor bloomberg will say over and over again, it's important to keep it open. it's part of the culture of the city. it's part of the beauty of the city. but it is truly a highway in the sky. and, you know, anyone, whether you're on the ground, anywhere in the city, you can look up and you will see that the skies are just full over the river. >> highway in the sky, wow, quite a statement there. all right. guys, we're going to have to leave it there. ken, mary, we appreciate it. coming up, a georgia woman's terrifying phone call, as she apparently is kidnapped on a remote road. she's on the phone with her boyfriend, then suddenly he hears her say "don't take me." the line drops. she hasn't been seen since.
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a frightening story in blairsville, georgia, north
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georgia. christie cornwell walking along a remote area tuesday. a walk she's taken many times near her parents' home. 38-year-old, talking to her boyfriend on the phone. he hears the concern in her voice as she sees a car approach. the last thing he hears, she is screaming and says, "don't take me." the line goes dead. she hasn't been seen since. joining me now to talk about this, michelle sigona. she's with "america's most wanted." also with us criminologist jack levin. on the phone john bankhead with the georgia bureau of investigation. and also joining us, richard cornwell, kristi's brother. richard, our thoughts and prayers are with you for your sister's safe return. richard, do you have any idea what could have happened to your sister here? >> well, from the evidence
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are we talking about country road, remote road here that your sounded like walked many times. >> yes. there's only a handful of houses on this road. it's a very rural area. and she did -- she liked to walk down this particular road, leaving her parents' house. >> got you. >> and she walked for exercise. tuesday night was when the abduction occurred on the country road. >> richard, what's your plea to whoever may have done this to your sister? >> we just plead that they would have mercy on her and return her safely back to her family. and we just want to say that we need her.
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and she has a 15-year-old son that needs her very much in his life. and -- >> well, richard -- >> we just pray she will be returned safely. >> we'll pray right along with you. pray for your strength and her safe return. richard cornwell, thanks again for joining us. i want to go to john bankhead on the phone, director of public affairs, georgia bureau of john, any leads in the search >> we have some tips that have area, about the time of the abduction. and we're following up on those >> what are we looking -- two that's what we're gathering? we've got the picture up there, white suv, gold/tan possibly toyota or nissan. we're getting pretty specific here. reliable, known in the community. and would know if there would be an unusual vehicle in that area. >> okay. and these cars do not belong to anybody who lives in that area?
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>> that's what we're looking at. right now we don't think that's the case. but road checks during the night and during the day, to interview people as they ride by to see if they have any information on those vehicles. >> let's bring in michelle sigona, "america's most wanted." michelle, anything you can add to the search? any leads you're hearing about? >> also from investigators, i have been in touch with our current investigators with us and they have brought in bloodhounds to help with that also, in addition, there's about brought forward volunteers and that are accepting information. we are accepting tips also at anonymously or call us at 1-800-crimetv. and we will pass those right off to investigators that are working there at the command post in georgia. that's something to consider. also, i learned today, kristi
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was a former probation officer, that she was going through a career change, in college, as a full-time student, working to be a lab technician and moving forward with her life. so we're just really hoping at this point that if anyone saw anything in that area, i want to encourage you, you don't have to be afraid, you can pick up and you can call down to your local working extremely hard and they are taking every lead seriously quickly as they can to find kristi. >> all right. let's bring in criminologist jack levin. jack, what are you seeing here? and how do you narrow this down? where do you start? >> well, you know, first of all, the police have a great advantage here. because you know, most of the missing people in this country are gone by choice. they want to get away from a bad situation. and the police are reluctant to get involved for a period of time.
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assaulted, and then killed within hours. so here at least the police know that she's not a missing person by choice. they have apparently ruled out the family members. and they are looking, i believe, for an acquaintance or a stranger. i think the idea that she was a probation officer, they would have to look at her clients and hopefully she will be brought home alive. >> yeah. that's right. you found some of kristi's taken. phone call between the boyfriend and the victim and responded to the scene. and -- >> john, we'll pick up right there after a break. stay with us.
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welcome back. this story, you've got to watch this video here. it's a holdup at a convenience store. the clerk is being held up by a robber. the husband of the clerk is not having any part of it. watch him come flying in here. look at that. armed robber, and it is go time, as the husband begins to wrestle this guy. it lasts about ten minutes. we'll pick up the story from there a little bit later in the show. if you have thoughts on it, call in, 1-877-tell-hln. and we want to hear from you on this story. michael vick, major announcement. a lot of people are talking about it. he signs with the philadelphia eagles after almost two years in a federal prison for dogfighting. he's going to take the field again. here he is speaking just a few hours ago at a news conference.
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>> you only get one shot at a second chance. and i'm conscious of that. >> i think he should have a chance at redemption. and the eagles are going to give it to him. two-year contract. we're talking about a strong organization. good coach. he's got a friend in donovan mcnabb. he's known vick since vick was a senior in high school. it's a great opportunity. yes, what michael vick good was heinous. but he's owning up to it. let's listen to michael vick. s >> i was wrong for what i did. everything that happened at that point in time in my life was wrong. and, you know, it was unnecessary. and to the life of me to this day i can't understand why i was involved in such pointless activity. and why did i risk so much at the pinnacle of my career. and i was naive to a lot of things. but i figure if i can help more animals than i hurt, i'm contributing, i'm doing my part.
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>> hopefully his platform playing football again will lead to the end of this barbaric dogfighting. so let's hope he can do some good out of all this. we'll take your calls, 1-877-tell-hln is the number. want to bring in anthony gorgano, sportscaster, philadelphia. also with us, welcoming him back again, stephen a. smith, journalist, with espn, with me at cnnsi, and with the "philadelphia inquirer." 13 years. he knows this teams, he knows the fans as well. we'll take your calls. before we go on, we got a brief snippet what fans are saying about the signing. let's listen to that and we'll take it from there. >> the guy has something he's going to bring to the team, make us better. so what? >> he's a great football player. >> whatever happened, he's done with it, he served his time. >> i'm just a little upset with it, because i'm such an animal lover. >> i'm not sure where we're going with this team. >> crazy signing. i don't know what they're going to do with the public relations part of it. >> all right. kind of mixed there. those are fans in philly.
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we want to hear from you, 1-877-tell-hln is the number. anthony, thumbs up or thumbs down on this from the fans? >> i think mostly thumbs down. >> really? >> yeah. i would look at it as a moderate uprising. hasn't been an all-out revolt. but fans haven't welcomed michael vick with open arms. >> any specifics on what they're saying? they just don't forgive him? >> well, it's not like you can just forgive him. they're kind of caught off guard. they don't know michael vick. this is not a town where he built up goodwill. so they view him strictly as what they saw, as a guy who did what he did, and they also question what he's going to do with this football team. >> we'll talk about that in a little bit. let's stick with the fans. stephen, again, you know the team. you know these fans. do you think they're going to embrace him? >> i think they'll embrace him if he's ultimately effective on the football field and he stays out of trouble. nobody knows the pulse of philadelphia better than my man anthony gargano. we've known each other for years. he's right on the money in terms of the fans are going to be down
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on him at the beginning because they don't know him. you also have to take into consideration, mike, this is a city that was down on t.o. because of an attitude issue. this is a man that helped them get to the super bowl. this is a man that helped donovan mcnabb report his best season statistically until last year, i believe. you consider what t.o. did, and the fact that the city turned against him. he didn't break any laws, didn't get into any trouble. he was just, you know, a malcontent. here you have a guy that committed a felony, that was responsible in large part for funding an operation in terms of torturing, hanging, electrocuting, killing and mamg do maiming dogs, it's going to be a long time. the city of philadelphia can be very hard on you. ultimately it's one of the best sports cities in america. it will stand by and support you if you do right. but if you do wrong, you do not want to be on their bad side. >> he makes a great point, anthony. let's face it, press, fans can be brute until philly. they booed santa one year, right? >> that's ancient history. what it is, though, it's a town
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that is prone, i think, to either loving you or overloving you or, like stephen said, it can be very, very harsh and it can bear its teeth. >> let me ask you this. michael vick busts out a 50-yard touchdown run, electrifying run. is all forgiven at that point? >> yeah. you know, in the end, we're all prone to hypocrisy in sports. so any kind of moral stance that the sports fan now will certainly dissipate if he's in the end zone or if he leads them to a super bowl. and something happens with donovan mcnabb. >> real quick, stephen, i've got a couple calls here. you say it's going to take more than a couple of touchdowns, huh? >> it will take more than a couple of touchdowns, no question about it. but also, if donovan mcnabb the positive contribution to the franchise without making a negative contribution off the
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field, and i think then you'll see a lot of people rallying around him. >> let's get a couple calls in. bob's with us in florida. bob, your thoughts here? >> caller: hello? >> caller: yeah. yeah. just -- my question i had was kind of different. why cleveland didn't try to draft him. but i just started thinking maybe because he has a dog pen, and i wondered if he'd get a violation of probation. >> a little bit of sarcasm on a friday. that brings up a good point, anthony. when the eagles go on the road, michael vick's going to take a beating. it's going to get ugly. >> it certainly will. it's interesting about how much he's going to play. like stephen said, donovan mcnabb is this team's quarterback, and how it goes is dependent on donovan mcnabb. i can see michael vick being in there for a half dozen plays, as a wildcat. andy reid likes to do different gadget plays. and there's a lot of things you can do with him. that's the role. but he's not going to come in here as a quarterback. donovan mcnabb, this is his team. >> yeah, exactly.
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>> mike and anthony, i'd like to make one other point. >> can we hold that? do we have to take a quick break, adrian? >> sure. >> let's take a quick break. we have calls lined up. we're also going to let you know what the humane society is saying about this. giving it a thumbs up or thumbs down. can michael vick help eradicate dogfighting? call in. 1-877-tell-hln.
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welcome back. michael vick back in the nfl. getting a lot of e-mails. this one coming to us from barbara in greensboro, north carolina. second chances should be earned,
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here's what -- not handed out like lollipops. do people really think one day michael vick thinks dogfighting is okay and the next day it is wrong? wake up, folks. well, he did have 17 months at here's what the humane society humane society, here's their he has pledged, talking about michael vick, to make a long-term commitment to participate in our community-based outreach programs to steer inner city at events with michael in we look forward to working together to combat dogfighting -- the problem of dogfighting in philadelphia and nationwide. stephen, you know, you and i talked about this, as this story was really simmering, that i think his career should be tied to real long-term work with the humane society. and from that it seems like that's the case. will that quiet the critics somewhat?
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>> it won't immediately. but i think over time, as he proves to be diligent in his efforts with the humane society, to curb the issue of animal cruelty and to address that head on, i think it's going to work wonders for him. the one thing that i would like to add, that i think people need to be very, very careful about, michael vick was convicted of a felony financing a dog fighting ring. let's judge him according to that. let's not think that all of a sudden we have the right to sit there and say, make a big issue if the man doesn't smile-f he gets in an argument with his teammate-f he gets stopped for a speeding ticket and all this other stuff. the man was convicted of funding a dogfighting ring. and as long as he refrains from any of that or any illegal activity, it's not for the rest of us to sit there and feel like we have the right to judge everything he does in his life. >> jeff's with us in california. jeff, what do you think of michael vick's work with the humane society? does that encourage you?
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>> caller: no, not really. i don't think he should be allowed to play football ever after all of the things that he did. you know, what i can think is of pete rose, he made a simple bet, and he was kicked out of baseball, and he was not even allowed to be in the hall of fame, you know. and he didn't hurt anybody or any animals or anything. he made a bet. >> all right. jeff saying he's out of there. let's bring back anthony gorgano, sports reporter, wip radio. as we dissect this and see his work with the humane society, anthony, do you see michael vick as sincere, as a changed man? >> not yet. i think you have to see him. i think right now, it begins his penance. he was just granted the opportunity. so of course he's going to say all the right things, and he did that today. but it's not ready just to welcome him back. now you have to prove to the masses that you are sincere. that you do want to do the right things. that you do want to help a city that, let's face it, is plagued by dogfighting.
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>> let's -- and hopefully he can help eradicate it. here's michael vick. let's listen to him again, guys. basically, no excuses. let's listen. >> we all use the excuse it was part of our culture. and, you know, i don't think that's an excuse. now i understand that people care about their animals. they care about the health -- you know, the welfare, the protection of animals. and now i do. >> all right. there it is. owning up to it right there. i've got to ask you this, anthony. stephen, you can weigh in as well. how are the fans in philly going to react if animal rights protesters come and disrupt eagles football? >> i think they understand the bigness of this whole thing and how this situation transcends sports. so they understand that. obviously, in the end it's a rabid football town and it wants to see its eagles. but it's going to expect a lot out of michael vick. and i think it's going to be interesting because michael vick is not going to be out in the forefront.
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michael vick is going to be more behind the scenes. and remember, he's only going to be there about a half dozen plays. >> right. stephen, real quick, go ahead. how are philly fans going to react to animal rights protesters? >> i think some will support him and come to the defense of michael vick. but at the end of the day, mike, it really does not matter. the fact is, as long as this guy obeys the law and doesn't engage in dogfighting and does his work with the humane society he's going to have his critics, he's going to have his advocates. that's really all it comes down to. all this other stuff everybody's mentioned, the man spent 18 months in a federal penitentiary. he couldn't drop the soap. he had to watch his back. he had a lot of stuff to be concerned about. now he's a free man. i don't think he's even concerned about it. he just wants to make sure he stays out of trouble. >> and he anthony, stephen, good conversation, guys. thank you so much. thanks to the viewers for the calls as well. we'll keep following it. here's a story for you. you've got to see this video. robber at a convenience store. well, the husband sees what's going on here. he's going to tackle the guy. it's about a ten-minute fight. we'll let you know how it all played out. take your calls in a little bit.
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we could call him a hero. let's get to our hero of the week. it's new york-based chemistry teacher jude nambuki. >> announcer: this is "cnn heroes." i was coming from college at night, and i see this computer thrown out. i found everything was perfect. so many computers are thrown out and so much computers are needed where i grew up in kenya. so i decided i must do something. my name is jude ndambuki. i refurbish discarded computers and send them to schools in kenya. the children in kenya have very few resources. even a pencil is very hard to get. any part that i can play to make the life of kids better, it's great. the computers are tested to make sure they are working. >> that's it. then we label the name of the school on each box, and then we ship it to kenya.
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the computers are saved from poisoning the environment, and they're going to be used for 20 years by some schools. every school is going to plant 100 trees for every computer. we are planting a seed, teaching the kids to conserve the environment and be engines of change. ♪ it's like giving the kids a new life. computers are getting new life, and trees are being planted to bring a new life, too. it's all connected.
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a new program is helping african-american men beat some pretty serious odds.
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it started with a surgeon who says he saw the same shooting, stabbing victims again and again in the trauma center. our "prime news" correspondent richelle carey has that story in our weekly feature "what matters." >> mike, young african-american men are at an increased risk of falling victim to gun violence. and those who survive are more likely to return to bad habits. but one man who could have become a statistic decided to make a change. and that's to face his future with strength, courage, and turn away from street life. here's don lemon with our sister network, cnn. >> this is where i used to get busy at, you know. >> reporter: adrian barnes admits he was a bad boy on baltimore streets. he says he even shot a man. >> i used to hustle drugs right here. here's where i got shot. >> reporter: barnes became a victim of the violence he inflicted, with two bullets in his leg. >> i was lying there, thinking about all the stuff i did to people. i had to learn from my lesson.
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>> reporter: recovering in maryland's shock trauma center, he had a conversation that changed his life. >> the probation officer back then that worked for the program asked me if i want to change my life. it. i thought yeah, i'm getting tired of living the way i'm living. >> reporter: the program is the violence intervention program or v.i.p. he started it after he saw the same shooting and stabbing victims again and again. >> we all get frustrated with seng patients we work so hard to save come back. i grew up in a neighborhood in south carolina. these guys were just like me. i did not feel these were individuals who were so steep in the way of life they could not turn them around. >> reporter: cooper treated street violence as a disease. >> we need the same approach to violence that we had with heart disease and smoking and embrace
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the problem of violence in our kids. they are dying. >> reporter: his cure? a combination of drug rehab, education and jobs. >> the patients who got our intervention were much less likely to be convicted. >> reporter: patients like adrian barnes who turned his life around. >> you need someone to show you and help you and care about you. the program never turned its back on me. >> that was don lemon from cnn reporting. since 1998, the v.i.p. program was committed to saving lives. more of what matters, check out the september issue of "essence" magazine or log on to cnn.com/whatmatters.
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